Author: oils

Dianthus caryophyllus (Plant Family: Caryophyllaceae) Carnation essential oil Carnation, also called grenadine or clove pink, herbaceous plant of the pink, or carnation, family (Caryophyllaceae), native to the Mediterranean area. It is widely cultivated for its fringe-petaled flowers, which often have a spicy fragrance, and is used extensively in the floral industry. There are two general groups, the border, or garden, carnations and the perpetual flowering carnations. Border carnations include a range of varieties and hybrids, 30 to 75 cm (1 to 2.5 feet) tall; the flowers, in a wide range of colours, are usually less than 5 cm (2 inches) in diameter and are borne on wiry, stiffly erect…

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Foeniculum vulgare var. dulce (Plant Family: Apiaceae/Umbelliferae) Used for centuries in a variety of applications, fennel is known for its distinct licorice flavor and aroma. Today, Fennel oil can be used for culinary purposes as well as internally to promote a healthy respiratory system,* healthy digestion and more. This unique oil holds many beneficial characteristics for the body, while providing the user with a sweet, distinctive scent. Type of plant: Tall herb growing up to 5 feet tall with delicate, feathery, lacelike leaves and small yellow flowers on a flowering head Part used: Seeds Method of extraction: Steam distillation Data:…

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Citronella leaves Cymbopogon nardus (Plant Family: Poaceae) Type of plant: Tall perennial grass with tufts of narrow fragrant leaves Part used: Leaves Method of extraction: Steam distillation Data: Citronella comes from the grass colloquially known as mana grass in Sri Lanka. It’s an important export for several Asian countries, where it’s used in cooking as well as to deter moths, fleas, spiders, ticks, mosquitoes, and other insects. In Chinese medicine, it’s used as a remedy for rheumatic pain. Principal places of production: Sri Lanka, China, Taiwan, Indonesia, Brazil, Madagascar When buying look for: A thin, yellow to light brown liquid…

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How to use essential oils for weight loss Essential oils are quickly becoming a household staple in many homes. Essential oils may be able to help you lose a few extra pounds if you’re trying to lose weight. The oils will not help you burn calories. They can, however, boost your metabolism, aid digestion, combat sugar cravings, and much more. How to use essential oils for weight loss There are two ways in which you can use essential oils for weight loss: Diffuse the essential oils in your home. Make a blend and massage it into your body on the…

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The essential oils can be used in various methods, so the best way to approach self-defense is to make up a blend of essential oils in a bottle, and then take the drops you need for each method of use when required. Kept undiluted in this way, they will remain active for a much longer time than if diluted. You can multiply the number of drops, but keep the proportions the same: Antibacterial blend 1 Ravensara 10 dropsEucalyptus radiata 8 dropsNiaouli 5 dropsGinger 10 dropsThyme 4 dropsLemongrass 3 drops Antibacterial blend 2 Frankincense5 dropsHo wood 6 dropsEucalyptus radiata 8 dropsLemon…

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Hemorrhoids (also referred to as piles) can be uncomfortable. They are essentially swollen veins on the anus or in the lower rectum, and they can cause symptoms like itching, discomfort, and rectal bleeding. Hemorrhoids inside of your rectum are called internal. Hemorrhoids that can be seen and felt outside of your rectum are external. This can cause pain, inflammation, and even rectal bleeding.  Hemorrhoids are usually caused by straining during bowel movements, obesity, or pregnancy.  It’s common to develop them throughout pregnancy because chronic constipation is often a common pregnancy symptom.  Constantly straining to empty your bowels creates pressure in this region.  It’s…

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The essential oils can be used in various methods, so the best way to approach self-defense is to make up a blend of essential oils in a bottle, and then take the drops you need for each method of use when required. Kept undiluted in this way, they will remain active for a much longer time than if diluted. You can multiply the number of drops, but keep the proportions the same: Antibacterial blend 1 Ravensara 10 dropsEucalyptus radiata 8 dropsNiaouli 5 dropsGinger 10 dropsThyme 4 dropsLemongrass 3 drops Antibacterial blend 2 Frankincense 5 dropsHo wood 6 dropsEucalyptus radiata 8…

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There are two basic ways to use the essential oils: in the environment around you, and on your physical body. Environmental methods Diffusers Room diffusers can be electric or designed around a simple tea light candle. Follow the instructions that come with the product. If you don’t possess a diffuser, the essential oil molecules can be dispersed by using a glass bowl or cup filled with steaming hot water, with the essential oils dropped on the water. The steam will rise and circulate the essential oils around the room. If there’s a lot of infection around, use 5–10 drops of…

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Type of plant: Perennial herb of the rush type, with blade-type leaves, small yellow flowers with violet tips, and capsules containing reddish brown seeds Part used: Seed pods Method of extraction: Steam distillation Data: Originating in Asia, cardamom was used by ancient cultures as both a medicine and a spice for at least 2,000 years before first being distilled in Europe in the sixteenth century. The seeds are dried before distillation. Cardamom remains an important component of traditional medicine in India and China and in some Middle Eastern countries. It is used as a digestive aid, for flavoring, and as…

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Carum carvi (Plant Family: Apiaceae/Umbelliferae) Type of plant: Flowering plant growing up to 2 feet in height, with feathery leaves and umbels of small white or pink flowers Part used: Seeds Method of extraction: Steam distillation Data: The seeds are sickle-shaped and striped. As the plant easily self-seeds, it can be found in many parts of Asia, Europe, and the United States. Caraway seeds have been found fossilized in ancient European sites, so we know they were being consumed at least 8,000 years ago. Caraway was known to the ancient Egyptians and the Romans, and indeed, caraway is still used…

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